Author: John Foster
John Foster is a historian of European politics.

Last week, I wrote at length about Set the Night on Fire, the definitive history of radical Los Angeles in the 1960s, co-written by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener. This might be the apotheosis of Davis’s career as a historian of the city. (More…)

Mike Davis is the most remarkable product of American intellectual culture working today. (More…)

No experience marked the life and work of Theodor Adorno so deeply as the confrontation with National Socialism. (More…)

The short twentieth century, running from 1914 to 1989 is generally divided into two halves. The first, ending 1945, is the era of mass slaughter. (More…)

The narrative of the Atlantic world since the end of the Second World War has been one of American leadership. (More…)

Everyone loves a good villain, especially one whose presence validates overlooking our own failings. (More…)

The term “crisis” is applied all too freely in politics and journalism. It has become a common designation for the Coronavirus outbreak as well. (More…)

Today’s philosophers don’t do well in crises. The case of Giorgio Agamben, in which he wrongly downplayed the danger posed by COVID-19, is a perfect example. (More…)

When Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign for the Democratic nomination earlier this week, the leftist finally gave Joe Biden what he’s been after for four decades: a run at the presidency. (More…)