Author: John Foster
John Foster is a historian of European politics.

Everyone loves a good villain, especially one whose presence validates overlooking our own failings. (More…)

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The term “crisis” is applied all too freely in politics and journalism. It has become a common designation for the Coronavirus outbreak as well. (More…)

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Today’s philosophers don’t do well in crises. The case of Giorgio Agamben, in which he wrongly downplayed the danger posed by COVID-19, is a perfect example. (More…)

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When Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign for the Democratic nomination earlier this week, the leftist finally gave Joe Biden what he’s been after for four decades: a run at the presidency. (More…)

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The crisis through which we (or at least most of us) are now living is defined by biopolitics. (More…)

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Long ago, when the single income of a TV dad like Ward Cleaver or a Jim Anderson could support a family with cash to spare, banking was viewed, not without justice, as a boring profession. (More…)

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The rape of hundreds of thousands of German women in the waning days of the Second World War has historically gotten short shrift, both as crime and tragedy. (More…)

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Irish politics has always moved in rhythms different to the rest of Europe. Saturday’s election is no exception. (More…)

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Memory is one of the most important elements of modern societies. Nowhere has its centrality been so fully illustrated than in Germany. (More…)

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