Author: Joel Schalit
Joel Schalit is the author of Israel vs. Utopia, and Jerusalem Calling. He has edited some of America's most influential magazines including Punk Planet and Tikkun and served as the news editor of the Brussels-based Euractiv. Schalit is the editor of The Battleground and Souciant. He also comments on EU affairs for Israel's i24News and China's CGTN.

Russia never goes out of style. Whether it’s blamed for subverting democracy, or praised for its role in defeating fascism, the country gets linked to everything in world politics. (More…)

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“Zingaraccia.” Repeated ad nauseum as though it were a mantra, the racist slang (Fucking Gypsy) has become an integral part of Matteo Salvini’s brand. (More…)

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No country, apart from the United States, is as riven with debate about its relationship with Israel as Germany. (More…)

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I could see Istanbul from the plane. Staring out of the Cessna window at the sprawling city below, from the coastline to the horizon, it was hard to believe that there was anything else to Turkey. (More…)

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“Their decision was racist,” my attorney said. “There was no legal basis to deny you permanent residency in Germany.” (More…)

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“You must come to Auschwitz. I go there once a year, with a group of third-generation Holocaust survivors.” Blond-haired and blue-eyed, in his late thirties, I found it hard to place him there. (More…)

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Guy Verhofstadt. Massimo D’Alema. Sigmar Gabriel. David Miliband. Over thirty strong, the list of former European foreign ministers and prime ministers had been attached to a letter published in The Guardian, imploring the EU to stay committed to the two-state solution. (More…)

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The first time the heads of Italy and Germany’s two biggest fascist parties met was in Venice, in June 1934. Things didn’t go so well for Benito Mussolini, who, a longtime hero of the new German chancellor, sought Adolf Hitler’s assurance that Italy could control Austria. (More…)

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New Zealand could not have been further away. Yet, somehow, Italy’s populist-in-chief found a way to make himself a victim of the Christchurch massacre, by claiming he would be scapegoated for the event. (More…)

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